Scorpio Sky

The Fighter

 

Trained in Mixed Martial Arts & Pro Wrestling, he transcends the world of entertainment while staying Stylish and Fit



Sky is an entertainer who floats through the worlds of
MMA, Pro Wrestling, Fitness, Style, & Hosting

Having spent 10+ years in front of live crowds, he has honed his skills in the art of performance. Being able to connect with his audience is a specialty which as taken him from small venues to large arenas, from the live experience to world wide broadcast.

It’s September 23, 2018.



I’m sitting in a sports bar, watching football on a Sunday, but finding myself distracted.

I’m thinking about the last year and what a success it’s been. How much fun I’ve had, and how excited I am for the future. Looking back, it was September 23, 2017 when I started my full time run with Ring of Honor.

That’s not all I’m thinking about, though. I’m going over everything it’s taken to get to this point, specifically the last two years. In January of 2016, I was working an office job, coming off of two years of inconsistent activity in the ring, and looking at a future that didn’t involve the wrestling business. I had taken my shots at both WWE and Impact Wrestling, and had come up short. I was readying myself to move on to a normal life.

On January 8, 2016, I got called into the boss’s office to be notified that I was being let go. After the shock wore off, the only thing I could think to do was go to my mother’s gravesite. She was always a source of comfort and motivation to me, but it had been two years since she had passed away from cancer. Months after she passed, my father also passed due to cancer. I was no stranger to loss, but this one felt strange. So I sat there thinking, letting it all sink in and wondering what my next move would be.

When I woke up the next day, it had become clear; I was never supposed to be working an office job. The only thing I’ve ever wanted to do was be a professional wrestler. Let’s give it one more shot. I felt as if I was at bat with two outs and two strikes with the game on the line, but to paraphrase Eminem in 8 Mile, “If something’s gonna happen, it needs to happen now.”

I had one game plan: Work as hard as I can, as often as I can, until people notice. So that’s what I did. I took every opportunity I could, but nobody was throwing me any big breaks. There was a whole new wave of talent to pick from, so I had to really put myself out there to compete with them. I was essentially a 14-year rookie.

Fortunately, I always had a home at Championship Wrestling from Hollywood, which gave me multiple chances a month to work on a televised product. But even then, I knew I needed more eyes on me. I went to work on building my website, my YouTube page, and my social media presence, but still, none of it seemed to garner much attention. I remember telling a close friend, “I feel as if all of the dominos in my life are lined up, but the first one is glued down.”

Later that year, I was contacted via Twitter DM by a guy named Al Lenhart, who wanted to start a wrestling company in Texas called WrestleCircus. I didn’t think much of it at first, in fact, I may not have even replied right away. But there weren’t too many others beating down my door, so eventually, I engaged in talks with him and I sure am glad I did.

The first few months of WrestleCircus were great; I hadn’t been on a show like that in years. It reminded me of the early PWG days that were so much fun, stacked with top talent. I struggled internally with my confidence, and actually wondered if I was good enough to even be on the shows. But I was there, and took it as a challenge to not only help the promotion grow but to grow along with it.

And grow it did. I watched the houses get bigger every month, the online viewers go up and they were giving me high profile matches. As WrestleCircus got bigger, I got bigger. Not only that, but my confidence grew, and I started having fun! Looking back it all felt so new, I truly was a rookie again.

Al called me one day and I immediately heard the excitement in his voice when I answered.

“We’re bringing Cody Rhodes in for our August show and offered him any match he wanted, and he chose YOU!”

Al had known of me for many years, even before we had met or worked together, and he as much as anyone had wanted to see me be successful. We enjoyed the moment together and when I got off the phone, I thought, “This is it!”

Cody is a legitimate star. Whatever he does, people pay attention to. So standing across the ring from him would be a big spotlight for me, but at the same time, I knew there would be people that would rather see someone else get that opportunity. So I pushed the match as much as I could. Every promo, every tweet, every moment I could steal, I’d talk about the big match. Eventually, I could see that it was working; I could see that excitement was growing in the weeks and the days leading up to it.

The night of the show, buzz was there and the building was sold out. The only thing left to do was perform.

I was pretty nervous because I didn’t know Cody. I’ve wrestled stars before, and more often than not, the match is a let down, because they either don’t want to do anything or just aren’t as good as you thought they’d be. Luckily, neither of these were true with Cody. He came to play and our chemistry couldn’t have been better. After a CrossRhodes into a pile of thumbtacks, Cody pinned me to win the match. I walked to the backstage area and kneeled down. Jack, a good friend and the ring announcer that night, came over to embrace me. “You did it.”

Weeks before that, I had woken up one morning, motivated as hell. I was never one to ask for an opportunity, but I said, “Screw it.” I sent three text messages to three people asking for a shot at three different companies. One was to my old friend Frankie Kazarian, asking if there was a chance I could get a match when Ring of Honor came to Las Vegas. He assured me that he’d ask, and within a short amount of time, he let me know that I was in!

Frankie had been trying to get me into ROH for a while. A year prior, he helped me get a “Future of Honor” match in Texas, but I the company was loaded with so much talent, I never really felt like I got a real look. But this time, with multiple wrestlers having departed to NXT, this felt like it could be a legit shot.

I thought I’d be nervous the day of the show, just like I’d been in the weeks leading up to it. But once I was there, I felt just ready. I hung with Frankie, Christopher Daniels, my old buddies the Young Bucks, and my new friend, Cody, and felt right at home. That night, I had a short match with Kushida and a rematch with the ROH champion himself, Cody, both of which I really enjoyed. Everyone seemed happy with them, and while I left with no promises, I was happy knowing that I did everything I could.

Then I got called to work the next ROH TV tapings in Philadelphia, THE WORST TOW-- You know the bit. Not only was I getting another shot, but it would be against the Bullet Club! I’ve been friends with the Young Bucks since we all started in the early-to-mid 2000s. We’d always had a great relationship. I hadn’t worked them since maybe 2013, but in that time they had made themselves into the hottest thing in wrestling, so this was going to be another big opportunity.

The match went great. Everyone shined, and the crowd loved it, so much so that I think this is what would eventually win me a full time spot with ROH. That, and Nick Jackson getting on the microphone after the show and demanding that they give me a job! “God bleth you for it, Nick.”

I’ve often called myself “Cinderella Man.” The original Cinderella Man was an old fighter named James J. Braddock, who had started his career with a lot of promise, but fell on hard times. During the Great Depression, he was essentially retired and struggled so much that he was on government assistance. Then, on a fluke, he got one big opportunity and made the most of it, shocking the world with an upset win. Then he won again, and again, eventually climbing the ranks to become heavyweight champion of the world. From the bread line to headline.
I feel like James J. Braddock. I am Cinderella Man.

It’s September 23, 2018.

I’m sitting in a sports bar, watching football on a Sunday, but finding myself distracted.

- Scorpio Sky and Tyler Davidson



It’s September 23, 2018.


I’m sitting in a sports bar, watching football on a Sunday, but finding myself distracted.

I’m thinking about the last year and what a success it’s been. How much fun I’ve had, and how excited I am for the future. Looking back, it was September 23, 2017 when I started my full time run with Ring of Honor.

That’s not all I’m thinking about, though. I’m going over everything it’s taken to get to this point, specifically the last two years. In January of 2016, I was working an office job, coming off of two years of inconsistent activity in the ring, and looking at a future that didn’t involve the wrestling business. I had taken my shots at both WWE and Impact Wrestling, and had come up short. I was readying myself to move on to a normal life.

On January 8, 2016, I got called into the boss’s office to be notified that I was being let go. After the shock wore off, the only thing I could think to do was go to my mother’s gravesite. She was always a source of comfort and motivation to me, but it had been two years since she had passed away from cancer. Months after she passed, my father also passed due to cancer. I was no stranger to loss, but this one felt strange. So I sat there thinking, letting it all sink in and wondering what my next move would be.

When I woke up the next day, it had become clear; I was never supposed to be working an office job. The only thing I’ve ever wanted to do was be a professional wrestler. Let’s give it one more shot. I felt as if I was at bat with two outs and two strikes with the game on the line, but to paraphrase Eminem in 8 Mile, “If something’s gonna happen, it needs to happen now.”

I had one game plan: Work as hard as I can, as often as I can, until people notice. So that’s what I did. I took every opportunity I could, but nobody was throwing me any big breaks. There was a whole new wave of talent to pick from, so I had to really put myself out there to compete with them. I was essentially a 14-year rookie.

Fortunately, I always had a home at Championship Wrestling from Hollywood, which gave me multiple chances a month to work on a televised product. But even then, I knew I needed more eyes on me. I went to work on building my website, my YouTube page, and my social media presence, but still, none of it seemed to garner much attention. I remember telling a close friend, “I feel as if all of the dominos in my life are lined up, but the first one is glued down.”

Later that year, I was contacted via Twitter DM by a guy named Al Lenhart, who wanted to start a wrestling company in Texas called WrestleCircus. I didn’t think much of it at first, in fact, I may not have even replied right away. But there weren’t too many others beating down my door, so eventually, I engaged in talks with him and I sure am glad I did.

The first few months of WrestleCircus were great; I hadn’t been on a show like that in years. It reminded me of the early PWG days that were so much fun, stacked with top talent. I struggled internally with my confidence, and actually wondered if I was good enough to even be on the shows. But I was there, and took it as a challenge to not only help the promotion grow but to grow along with it.

And grow it did. I watched the houses get bigger every month, the online viewers go up and they were giving me high profile matches. As WrestleCircus got bigger, I got bigger. Not only that, but my confidence grew, and I started having fun! Looking back it all felt so new, I truly was a rookie again.

Al called me one day and I immediately heard the excitement in his voice when I answered.

“We’re bringing Cody Rhodes in for our August show and offered him any match he wanted, and he chose YOU!”

Al had known of me for many years, even before we had met or worked together, and he as much as anyone had wanted to see me be successful. We enjoyed the moment together and when I got off the phone, I thought, “This is it!”

Cody is a legitimate star. Whatever he does, people pay attention to. So standing across the ring from him would be a big spotlight for me, but at the same time, I knew there would be people that would rather see someone else get that opportunity. So I pushed the match as much as I could. Every promo, every tweet, every moment I could steal, I’d talk about the big match. Eventually, I could see that it was working; I could see that excitement was growing in the weeks and the days leading up to it.

The night of the show, buzz was there and the building was sold out. The only thing left to do was perform.

I was pretty nervous because I didn’t know Cody. I’ve wrestled stars before, and more often than not, the match is a let down, because they either don’t want to do anything or just aren’t as good as you thought they’d be. Luckily, neither of these were true with Cody. He came to play and our chemistry couldn’t have been better. After a CrossRhodes into a pile of thumbtacks, Cody pinned me to win the match. I walked to the backstage area and kneeled down. Jack, a good friend and the ring announcer that night, came over to embrace me. “You did it.”

Weeks before that, I had woken up one morning, motivated as hell. I was never one to ask for an opportunity, but I said, “Screw it.” I sent three text messages to three people asking for a shot at three different companies. One was to my old friend Frankie Kazarian, asking if there was a chance I could get a match when Ring of Honor came to Las Vegas. He assured me that he’d ask, and within a short amount of time, he let me know that I was in!

Frankie had been trying to get me into ROH for a while. A year prior, he helped me get a “Future of Honor” match in Texas, but I the company was loaded with so much talent, I never really felt like I got a real look. But this time, with multiple wrestlers having departed to NXT, this felt like it could be a legit shot.

I thought I’d be nervous the day of the show, just like I’d been in the weeks leading up to it. But once I was there, I felt just ready. I hung with Frankie, Christopher Daniels, my old buddies the Young Bucks, and my new friend, Cody, and felt right at home. That night, I had a short match with Kushida and a rematch with the ROH champion himself, Cody, both of which I really enjoyed. Everyone seemed happy with them, and while I left with no promises, I was happy knowing that I did everything I could.

Then I got called to work the next ROH TV tapings in Philadelphia, THE WORST TOW-- You know the bit. Not only was I getting another shot, but it would be against the Bullet Club! I’ve been friends with the Young Bucks since we all started in the early-to-mid 2000s. We’d always had a great relationship. I hadn’t worked them since maybe 2013, but in that time they had made themselves into the hottest thing in wrestling, so this was going to be another big opportunity.

The match went great. Everyone shined, and the crowd loved it, so much so that I think this is what would eventually win me a full time spot with ROH. That, and Nick Jackson getting on the microphone after the show and demanding that they give me a job! “God bleth you for it, Nick.”

I’ve often called myself “Cinderella Man.” The original Cinderella Man was an old fighter named James J. Braddock, who had started his career with a lot of promise, but fell on hard times. During the Great Depression, he was essentially retired and struggled so much that he was on government assistance. Then, on a fluke, he got one big opportunity and made the most of it, shocking the world with an upset win. Then he won again, and again, eventually climbing the ranks to become heavyweight champion of the world. From the bread line to headline.
I feel like James J. Braddock. I am Cinderella Man.

It’s September 23, 2018.

I’m sitting in a sports bar, watching football on a Sunday, but finding myself distracted.

- Scorpio Sky and Tyler Davidson